Wednesday, 24 September 2014

Germanic Pagan Lego

Here follows a Lego tribute to the traditional Germanic Gods. The Gods depicted immediately below are meant to depict (from left to right): Heimdall (with a red shield), Freyr (horned), Freyja (in purple), Thor (with red hair), Loki (in the back), Odin (bearded), Skadi (blue shield) and Tyr. Of course there are many more Germanic deities than this.*
Source: brickshelf.com

One of the most revered Gods in the Germanic pantheon is Odin (also known as Wodan, Woden and Wotan). Very often he is portrayed as one-eyed, for it is said that he traded an eye for a drink from the waters of wisdom. Odin is the God of writing, wisdom, cunning, eloquence, travel, prosperity and psychopomp. In ancient times Odin was equated with Mercury and so the Latin dies Mercurii (Mercury's day) was translated into Germanic languages as Wodens' day, which we now call Wednesday.
Source: mocpages.com

Odin is traditionally associated with kingship. Germanic Pagan kings often claimed descent from Odin and he is sometimes depicted in Norse mythology as the King of the Gods. The weapon most commonly associated with Odin is the spear - hence the many spears in this image below.
Source: svesamikreteni.deviantart.com

Depicted below is a Valkyrie. Valkyries are said to be maidens sent by Odin onto battlefields to choose warriors among the dead who died bravely and are thus worthy to feast at Valhalla (in the afterlife) - Odin's great hall.
Source: flickr.com/photos/carlo_montoya

Another major God of the Germanic pantheon is Thor. His name comes from the ancient Germanic word for thunder. Thor is the protecting God of the sky, rain, thunder and lightning. Traditionally he is portrayed as red-headed and extremely strong and brave. According to Norse mythology he rides in a chariot pulled by goats and wields a mighty war hammer called Mjollnir. In ancient times Thor was equated with Jupiter (also called Jove) and so the Latin dies Jovis (Jove's day) was translated into Germanic languages as Thor's day, which we now call Thursday.
Source: thorskegga.deviantart.com

Freyja (also known as Freya and Frija) is the most renowned of the Germanic Goddesses. She is the Goddess of love, life and fertility, as well as death - like Odin she is said to choose slain warriors to feast in the afterlife in a great hall. She is said to wear a famous necklace called Brisingamen and to ride a chariot pulled by cats. It is also said she can transform herself into the shape of a falcon. In ancient times Freyja was equated with Venus. Thus the Latin dies Veneris (Venus' day) was translated into Germanic languages as Frija's day, which we now call Friday.
Source: rakuten.com.my

On the shield on the right of this picture there are some words written in runes - the original alphabet of the Germanic people. Odin is said to have discovered the runes during a shamanic ritual whereby he hung from the world tree Yggdrasil for nine days and nine nights. This story confirms Odin as the father of writing and thus of the knowledge which runes preserve.   
Source: flickr.com

The ancient Germanic people were famous for their bravery in battle and it is said that the bravest of them all go to Valhalla after being slain in battle. Here warriors are said to hone their fighting skills and feast in Odin's great hall, until the coming of Ragnarok, which marks the end of our age. 
Source: mocpages.com

Valhalla is said to be a great hall, perhaps similar to the longhouses in which ancient and medieval Germanic people lived and feasted in Midgard (our world, among the eight others).
Source: eurobricks.com

The coming of Ragnarok marks the end of our age, when a great battle will rage and Yggdrasil (within which our world, Midgard, lays) will be destroyed. This is not the end of times however (though it is the end of our times), for a new cosmos will emerge from the ashes of our own and so the cycle of life goes ever onward.
Source: eurobricks.com

* An excellent website where you can find out more about the Germanic Gods is norse-mythology.org.

Sources: most of this post was written ad lib but occasionally facts were checked by going to britannica.com and norse-mythology.org, this latter source is, imo, the best online resource dealing with Germanic Heathenry.


Written by M. Sentia Figula. Find me at neo polytheistRoman Pagan and on Facebook.

No comments:

Post a Comment